Sunday, November 14, 2004

I forced TheLimey to read Asimov's The End of Eternity, which I suspected he would like as much as I did. I hadn't read it in many years, maybe since my teens, and was surprised to find that it had weathered the years extremely well.

As I was reading it, I thought to myself, "Wow, for something written in the '50s, this somehow managed to remain very undated--even the descriptions of technology seem contemporary!" Then I seem to remember looking at the copyright date and it being in the '30s, which blew me away.

...But now I can't find any reference to its being anything other than 1955, when it was published, and TheLimey has my copy so I can't look inside to see what the heck I was looking at!

Well, anyway--it's still a damn good book. One whose plot hasn't aged in all this time. It makes a lot of current authors look like they're writing cheap retreads. And I hear that the plot twists kept TheLimey awake until 1am a couple of nights. Heh.

Maybe I should dust off The Caves of Steel next.

11 comments:

D said...

Definitly 1950's. 55 my copy says.

liz said...

What was I thinking, then? Maybe I was imagining it was written in the '70s, but saw that it was from the '50s.

D said...

Still, your point about his incredible foresight still stands. Asimov is one of my favourite science fiction authors. I studied alot of robotics at university and it's amazing how often something he wrote comes up in real robotics.

liz said...

Those things occurred *because he predicted them*! (I'm pretty sure that's how it worked.) Maybe he really was a time-traveler.

(I have yet to see women's shoes with bells on become popular, though...from one of those Foundation books.)

argotnaut said...

_We_ could start those, except that the constant jingling would drive me nuts. Maybe that's why it never caught on.

D said...

Noooo, now I'm stuck in one of those time loops. Asimov goes forward in time, sees the future, comes back, predicits it, it happens because he predicted it, but how could he have gone into a future that only existed because he predicted it as he hadn't yet predicted it and made it happen. Arggggghhh. *brain explodes*

liz said...

It works if one accepts a premise of predestination. If it were destined to happen, a loop would be irrelevant.

Or else with outside intervention, such as Eternity, of course.

Liddy said...

A librarian weighs in: 1955 was the first edition. Bibliography prevails again!

liz said...

Just goes to show once again how precarious memory of certain information types can be!

liz said...

Okay, but wait a minute--that was the publishing date, right? What was the *copyright* date?

Liddy said...

Also 1955. I could bore a hole in you with the history of book cataloging rules, but it'll be more pleasant for everyone involved if I don't have to do that.